Education and Workforce Development

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October 25, 2016
A “yes” vote on Question 2 is a vote for Maine students, a vote for tax fairness and a vote for the economy. by Sarah Austin, Bangor Daily News, October 26, 2016 Maine people know how important education is for our kids and economy.

Education and Workforce DevelopmentMaine is renowned for the productivity and strong work ethic of its labor force. To find and advance in well-paying jobs, Mainers must have a good education, preferably including college or other post-secondary degrees and certifications. In order to grow and compete in the national and global economies, Maine businesses need workers with the training and skills of the 21st century. MECEP research and analysis assist policymakers in assessing the effectiveness of specific programs and determining budget priorities. We also strive to identify policies that will make post-secondary education and job training more affordable and enable those seeking to advance their education to overcome obstacles like the cost of child care.

Most Recent
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March 27, 2017
A recent data analysis shows that the percentage of Maine children living in deep poverty — defined as living on less than $10,000 a year for a family of three — has increased at a rate eight times greater than the national average, according to the Maine Center for Economic Policy.
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March 21, 2017
PDF of the press release click here Declined federal funds include Medicaid expansion, children’s health insurance, public works infrastructure, nutrition assistance, and other priorities Augusta, Maine (March 21, 2017) New analysis released today by the nonpartisan Maine Center for Economic Policy (MECEP) finds that over $1.9 billion in available federal funds that the state has forfeited since 2011 could have helped protect health and well-being, promote tax fairness, and boost Maine’s economy.
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March 20, 2017
“Representatives from the Maine Center for Economic Policy also testified against the bill. They claim the wealthiest 1% of Maine households will still pay a lower effective tax rate than 75% of Maine’s middle class families.” by Taylor Kinzler, WABI-TV, March 21, 2017 Eliminating Maine’s 3% surtax on the state’s highest earners.
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March 20, 2017
Augusta, Maine (Monday, March 20, 2017) State legislators on the taxation committee will hold a public hearing today on several bills that would roll back the tax to pay for education enacted under Question 2, the ballot initiative passed by Maine voters in November 2016.
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March 20, 2017
“Now that Question 2 is law, Maine has a bona fide path to fully funding education in 2018 and the wealthiest 1% of Maine households still pay a lower effective tax rate than the middle 75% of Maine families.
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March 16, 2017
“The Trump budget is really a disaster from our perspective, and nothing more than a down payment on tax cuts for the wealthy at the expense of everyone else,” said Garrett Martin, executive director of the Maine Center for Economic Policy.
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March 10, 2017
Michael Shepherd and Christopher Cousins, Bangor Daily News, March 10, 2017 Good morning from Augusta, where Gov. Paul LePage’s Office of Policy and Management released an economic impact study on a new 3 percent surtax on income over $200,000 that is drawing some criticism over its methodology.
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March 10, 2017
Don Cookson, host of WZON-AM’s The Pulse Morning Show, interviewed Garrett Martin about the LePage administration’s flawed analysis of the economic impacts of the successful Q2 education funding referendum, click here.
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March 10, 2017
Garrett Martin Economic impact analysis is not an exact science. It is rife with assumptions. Bad assumptions result in bad analysis. And bad analysis yields bad public policy.
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February 3, 2017
Here are three reasons why Maine lawmakers should reject Governor LePage’s FY18/19 budget proposal: 1. Ignoring the Will of Maine Voters The governor’s proposed state budget completely eliminates Question 2—the ballot initiative passed by voters in November that would increase state funding for our public schools by asking only those making over $200,000 to pay a little more.