Health Care

March 10, 2017
New analysis by MECEP shows that the Washington Republicans’ plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will hit Mainers especially hard, due to the restructuring of federal subsidies for health insurance purchased through the individual market. Read More...

Health CareAccess to quality, affordable health care is essential not only to the well-being and prosperity of Mainers and their families,but to the strength and vitality of the state’s economy. Without health care coverage, people are unlikely to have regular check-ups or to receive preventive and diagnostic care. They are more likely to postpone treatment until their health needs are more serious and more costly to treat. When they finally do seek treatment, hospital emergency rooms are their option of last resort. When patients lack insurance and the ability to pay, hospitals pass on the costs to those who are insured. Workers without health coverage have a higher absentee rate, costing their employers more in decreased productivity. MECEP research, analysis, policy development, and outreach have consistently and reliably informed the discussion of Maine’s health care priorities and the most effective means to address them. Policymakers, health care advocates, the media, and the public rely on the quality and credibility of MECEP’s work to inform the discussion and help craft and implement effective health care policies for Maine.

Most Recent
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May 25, 2017
From 2011 to 2015, the proportion of Maine children living in extreme poverty, family earnings of less than $10,000 per year, grew at eight times the national average, according to data from the Maine Center for Economic Policy.
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May 18, 2017
Don Cookson, host of WZON-AM’s The Pulse Morning Show, interviewed James Myall about new analysis from the national Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) which demonstrates that the American Health Care Act (AHCA), as passed by the US House of Representatives, would undermine every part of the health care system in rural areas including most of Maine.
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May 4, 2017
House AHCA passage vote 5-4-2017 CC version
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April 19, 2017
“People who were young and healthy certainly benefited,” says Garrett Martin, executive director of the Maine Center for Economic Policy. “But small businesses that had older employees or were in rural parts of the state really got hung out to dry.” Michael Hiltzik, Chicago Tribune, April 19, 2017 When our hard-working members of Congress return to work next week refreshed from their 18-day Easter recess, they’re planning to take up healthcare reform again.
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April 19, 2017
The Maine Women’s Lobby, Maine Center for Economic Policy, Maine AFL-CIO, Maine Education Association, Maine People’s Alliance, the Maine chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the National Partnership for Women and Families all testified in favor of the bill.
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April 17, 2017
“Rather than building as big an insurance pool as possible so the costs got meted out more broadly, what the program did is sequester those people,” explained Garrett Martin, the executive director of the Maine Center for Economic Policy. 
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April 10, 2017
Access to paid sick time would be one of the most meaningful changes this committee could make to the lives of working Mainers. Every year, tens of thousands of workers lose wages to care for themselves, a sick child, or an elderly relative because their employer does not offer paid sick time.
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April 5, 2017
It’s a bad time for Maine to forfeit federal funds that allow intervention to take place. However, that’s exactly what our state has done, according to a report out recently from the Maine Center for Economic Policy.
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March 31, 2017
Despite this major shortfall in needed programs, a report out last week from the Maine Center for Economic Policy revealed that in 2016, the DHHS failed to spend $800,000 in federal funds available to help adolescents struggling with substance use disorders.
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March 30, 2017
Moreover, according to a recent [Maine Center for Economic Policy] report, the state has explicitly chosen not to pursue federal grant opportunities to address colorectal cancer screening rates, to improve water testing for arsenic and lead and to address other critical public health problems and needs.