Legislative Priorities

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May 8, 2017
For several years now, Maine’s approach to child poverty has effectively been to ignore it. Federal money earmarked for specific purpose of addressing this problem has been left untouched while tens of thousands of children struggle without enough food to eat, a stable place to live, and just one incident away from family catastrophe.

Legislative PrioritiesEach year, in addition to our work to promote fair progressive tax and budget policies, MECEP identifies specific legislative objectives: measures we will work with legislators and our progressive partners to propose and advance, bills we will seek to modify to make them more effective in promoting economic justice, and legislative initiatives that we will work with legislators and allies to defeat in order to protect the interests of families and our values of fairness and shared prosperity. A key component of this effort is the testimony we provide to legislative committees.

Most Recent
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May 17, 2017
A convention such as this threatens our constitution and the protections it affords to our most fundamental rights. It will hurt Mainers’ economic security and have disastrous consequences for our state’s economy.
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May 10, 2017
We need to ensure that the benefits of immigration are available to all parts of Maine. It’s fair to acknowledge that many Maine towns just lack the resources to easily support translators, adult education classes, or career navigators.
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May 10, 2017
In Maine, most students do borrow for college. Sixty-three percent left school with debt in 2015, carrying an average debt load of $30,000. The debt load is even higher at Maine’s public universities.
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May 8, 2017
A prosperous future for Maine and a robust economy requires more middle-wage jobs with good benefits and working conditions that are compatible with family life. Maine cannot survive as an economy with a few people with good wages and benefits and the rest who struggle to provide for basic necessities.
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May 8, 2017
For several years now, Maine’s approach to child poverty has effectively been to ignore it. Federal money earmarked for specific purpose of addressing this problem has been left untouched while tens of thousands of children struggle without enough food to eat, a stable place to live, and just one incident away from family catastrophe.
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May 2, 2017
The Competitive Skills Scholarship program provides grants to low-income students not only for tuition and books, but also for child care, transportation, and emergencies critical for adult students to enter and stay in school.
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April 24, 2017
  Real reform of Maine’s safety net programs requires addressing the causes of poverty, and the ability of Mainers to get into work, education, or training.
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April 24, 2017
We have a public and economic interest in making sure that students have access to affordable higher education that will give them the skills they need to get good-paying jobs.
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April 11, 2017
Maine people and businesses rely on safe, efficient roads and bridges in order to get to work, and conduct commerce. Tourism, the lifeblood of the state’s economy, is totally dependent on the ability of Americans, Canadians, and other visitors to travel to, and around our state.
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April 11, 2017
Seniors, veterans, and all Maine families and individuals who are doing their best to get by in difficult times need fair and responsible resources that will truly help them over a hump.