Maine Families

Most Recent
April 5, 2017
It’s a bad time for Maine to forfeit federal funds that allow intervention to take place. However, that’s exactly what our state has done, according to a report out recently from the Maine Center for Economic Policy.
April 5, 2017
The potential benefits of the recent minimum wage increase could be jeopardized for workers, families, children, and seniors if the proposals to eliminate indexing or reduce minimum wage levels are approved.
April 4, 2017
Workers who rely on tips don’t benefit from the existence of a lower tipped minimum wage. That’s the conclusion of a variety of sources that compare the earnings of workers in those states without a “tip credit” and those which maintain one.
April 3, 2017
Imagine you’re a cashier at the height of flu season and three of your coworkers called in sick on a Saturday afternoon—one of the busiest times of the week. Lines are long, customers are grumpy, and your efforts to keep the line moving prevent you from being as personable as you would be under other circumstances. Despite circumstances beyond your control customers keep docking your pay. Through no fault of your own, and even though you’re doing more work, you’re going to get less pay at the end of the day.
April 3, 2017
Maine’s economic future hinges on our ability to attract, retain, and maximize the contributions of racial and ethnic populations. Relative to other states and nations, Maine is not necessarily an outlier in terms of the aging of our population.
March 31, 2017
Garrett Martin As the deadline for filing income taxes approaches, tens of thousands of Mainers who don’t owe any income tax should still file a return in order to benefit from refundable state tax credits.
March 31, 2017
Despite this major shortfall in needed programs, a report out last week from the Maine Center for Economic Policy revealed that in 2016, the DHHS failed to spend $800,000 in federal funds available to help adolescents struggling with substance use disorders.
March 27, 2017
A recent data analysis shows that the percentage of Maine children living in deep poverty — defined as living on less than $10,000 a year for a family of three — has increased at a rate eight times greater than the national average, according to the Maine Center for Economic Policy.
March 21, 2017
“The Maine Center for Economic Policy says it undertook the study to bring together scattered reports about grants not sought and available funds not accessed by the state.
March 21, 2017
PDF of the press release click here Declined federal funds include Medicaid expansion, children’s health insurance, public works infrastructure, nutrition assistance, and other priorities Augusta, Maine (March 21, 2017) New analysis released today by the nonpartisan Maine Center for Economic Policy (MECEP) finds that over $1.9 billion in available federal funds that the state has forfeited since 2011 could have helped protect health and well-being, promote tax fairness, and boost Maine’s economy.